Office Management Tools Used in a Family Literacy Center

OFFICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS

USED IN A FAMILY LITERACY CENTER


Manager, Family Literacy Centers, inc.


A smoothly functioning literacy center requires substantial paper work.  Family Literacy Incorporated and modern technology can help with many of the routine office tasks.   


Previous articles have discussed the necessity of tracking student progress and tutor hours, collecting many kinds of data, and communicating with parents, teachers and civic leaders.  The Family Literacy Center website provides a number of preprinted forms you can copy and use.  Several of these are included in the accompanying manual that is also downloadable from our site.


Family Literacy has also provided a self instructional program consisting of a booklet and disk, which teaches several key computer skills.  We’ll explain this program a little later and demonstrate how it works.


Let’s look at a sampling of the forms you might find useful.  To start you’ll need registration and information forms for students and tutors.  Each student will need a placement form and a Home Reading Log.


For tutors there are sign-in sheets.  Such forms as these can be copied and used as is.  Certain kinds of tracking and information gathering functions are best done on the computer.  Examples are student assessment records, or tutor and student information sheets.


Most centers distribute a newsletter, which is relatively easy and professional looking with the help of good computer software.  An example of a newsletter is in the print materials.


There are always letters of congratulations for achievements and recommendations to be written not to mention tutor tips and other information.  For special presentations a slide shown on computer is professional and impressive.  Think how much easier these and other tasks can be with the help of technology!


Accompanying this training is a self-instructional print program introducing useful computer technology.  Designed for both Macintosh or PC’s, the training allows learners to proceed at their own pace.  


It comes with a special disk that walks the learner through the instruction and provides examples.  The program teaches the following skills.  It begins with basic functions of a computer and  basic word processing.

It explains how to create and use simple computer graphics.  These are useful for newsletters and special presentations.


It explains how to create spreadsheets for records and databases.  Spreadsheets are handy for student and tutor data - including attendance, assignments, personal information, and progress.  Spreadsheets make it possible to quickly organize data in various ways for use in proposals or reports.  The training demonstrates how to create charts and graphs based on various kinds of data.  You will learn how to create a mail merge document, useful for special group mailings to parents, teachers, and administrators.  This feature alone will save hours of office time.


One segment of the training explains how to create and format a professional newsletter.  Newsletters are an effective way to communicate information to parents and teachers as well as civic groups.  And when you are ready to present your information to a group, you’ll be interested in knowing how to use Powerpoint, a multi-media program designed to create professional slide presentations.  Of course many other such presentation programs are available and most use similar conventions.


The training helps with internet skills as well--for example, how to access information sites on the World Wide Web, how to send and receive email, and how to design a simple Web page for your center, using HTML code or an application program such as Go Live!, Front Page, or Page Mill.


This is how the instruction works.  Suppose a student is learning how to do word processing.  The first page of the printed materials states what the student will learn, listed under purpose.   


Acquiring skill in managing an office and using computer technology will increase your competence and satisfaction in directing a center.  Of course  many other tools exist that will help in your training needs.  Family Literacy is currently working on delivering more training via interactive video through the internet.  Check our website at www.flcinc.org for more information.

OFFICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS

USED IN A FAMILY LITERACY CENTER


by Dr. Edward Green,

Manager, Family Literacy Centers, inc.


A smoothly functioning literacy center requires substantial paper work.  Family Literacy Incorporated and modern technology can help with many of the routine office tasks.   


Previous articles have discussed the necessity of tracking student progress and tutor hours, collecting many kinds of data, and communicating with parents, teachers and civic leaders.  The Family Literacy Center website provides a number of preprinted forms you can copy and use.  Several of these are included in the accompanying manual that is also downloadable from our site.


Family Literacy has also provided a self instructional program consisting of a booklet and disk, which teaches several key computer skills.  We’ll explain this program a little later and demonstrate how it works.


Let’s look at a sampling of the forms you might find useful.  To start you’ll need registration and information forms for students and tutors.  Each student will need a placement form and a Home Reading Log.


For tutors there are sign-in sheets.  Such forms as these can be copied and used as is.  Certain kinds of tracking and information gathering functions are best done on the computer.  Examples are student assessment records, or tutor and student information sheets.


Most centers distribute a newsletter, which is relatively easy and professional looking with the help of good computer software.  An example of a newsletter is in the print materials.


There are always letters of congratulations for achievements and recommendations to be written not to mention tutor tips and other information.  For special presentations a slide shown on computer is professional and impressive.  Think how much easier these and other tasks can be with the help of technology!


Accompanying this training is a self-instructional print program introducing useful computer technology.  Designed for both Macintosh or PC’s, the training allows learners to proceed at their own pace.  


It comes with a special disk that walks the learner through the instruction and provides examples.  The program teaches the following skills.  It begins with basic functions of a computer and  basic word processing.

It explains how to create and use simple computer graphics.  These are useful for newsletters and special presentations.


It explains how to create spreadsheets for records and databases.  Spreadsheets are handy for student and tutor data - including attendance, assignments, personal information, and progress.  Spreadsheets make it possible to quickly organize data in various ways for use in proposals or reports.  The training demonstrates how to create charts and graphs based on various kinds of data.  You will learn how to create a mail merge document, useful for special group mailings to parents, teachers, and administrators.  This feature alone will save hours of office time.


One segment of the training explains how to create and format a professional newsletter.  Newsletters are an effective way to communicate information to parents and teachers as well as civic groups.  And when you are ready to present your information to a group, you’ll be interested in knowing how to use Powerpoint, a multi-media program designed to create professional slide presentations.  Of course many other such presentation programs are available and most use similar conventions.


The training helps with internet skills as well--for example, how to access information sites on the World Wide Web, how to send and receive email, and how to design a simple Web page for your center, using HTML code or an application program such as Go Live!, Front Page, or Page Mill.


This is how the instruction works.  Suppose a student is learning how to do word processing.  The first page of the printed materials states what the student will learn, listed under purpose.   


Acquiring skill in managing an office and using computer technology will increase your competence and satisfaction in directing a center.  Of course  many other tools exist that will help in your training needs.  Family Literacy is currently working on delivering more training via interactive video through the internet.  Check our website at www.flcinc.org for more information.

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